Grant’s Crossing of the James River

Intro General Grant’s strategic military genius has been continually downplayed in modern times, often leading to a lack of comprehension of his astounding military skills. He has especially been branded as a butcher due to his high casualty rate in the 1864 Overland Campaign. Yet his strategic successes at Fort Henry & Donelson, Vicksburg and... Continue Reading →

The Anaconda Plan Civil War

The Anaconda Plan - Winfield Scott The Anaconda Plan was the strategic plan proposed by General Winfield Scott early in the American Civil War. General Winfield Scott's Anaconda Plan was designed to defeat the Confederate States of America (CSA) through economic measures rather than a land war. The purpose of Scott's plan was to devise an... Continue Reading →

What did the Confederate Constitution Say

Background - The Confederate Constitution The primary author of the Constitution of the Confederate States of America (CSA) was Robert Barnwell Rhett, an elected representative to the Provisional Confederate States Congress from South Carolina. He chaired a committee of twelve appointed by the Provisional Confederate States Congress in Montgomery Alabama beginning on February 5, 1861.... Continue Reading →

Did the South Have a Legal Right to Secede

Introduction Did the South have a legal right to secede? Is the United States a unified nation in which the individual states merged their sovereign rights and identities forever, or is it a federation of sovereign states joined together temporarily from which they can withdraw at any time? Whether or not states had the constitutional... Continue Reading →

Emory Upton Infantry Tactics

Introduction - Double and Single Rank Emory Upton infantry tactics were improvised during a charge at Spotsylvania on May 10, 1864 and changed not only the course of the Civil War but also how warfare is conducted. The customary infantry assault of the era used a wide battle line advancing slowly, firing at the enemy... Continue Reading →

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