25 facts/statistics on the battle of Antietam

Intro

The Battle of Antietam is one of the most significant battles of the American Civil War and of American history. This battle resulted when General Robert E. Lee took his army into the North for the first time. The second invasion of the North would occur a year later (1863) during the Gettysburg Campaign.

Prior to the battle, Union soldiers had clashed with the Army of Northern Virginia at the Battle of Second Bull Run. This was a resounding victory for General Robert E. Lee and his Confederate army.

The Battle of Antietam began when the Army of the Potomac under George B. McClellan met the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia at Sharpsburg, Maryland.

The battle would rage for two days and would result in the deadliest day of the American Civil War and of American history.

In the aftermath of the battle President Abraham Lincoln issued his famous Emancipation Proclamation. Lincoln had been waiting for a Union victory to issues this order. While, the battle was not an outright victory for the Union, it was a tactical victory as they held the field. This was enough for Lincoln to issue the Emancipation Proclamation.

The Emancipation Proclamation prevented France and Great Britain from joining the Confederacy and aiding them by making the war truly about slavery.

The following facts about the battle and statistics will take you through the background on the battle, the battle itself, and the results of the Battle of Antietam.

Background

  • This was Robert E. Lee’s first invasion of the North during the Civil War. (American Battlefield Trust)
  • McClellan found Robert E. Lee’s battle plans in a cigar wrapper before the Battle of Antietam. (American Battlefield Trust)
  • The Battle of Antietam began with a flanking maneuver (going around and attacking from behind) on Lee’s left flank. (American Battlefield Trust)

The Battle

  • The Battle of Antietam began on September 16, 1862. (American Battlefield Trust)
  • The first of three Federal attacks at the Battle of Antietam began at Miller’s cornfield and the West Woods. (American Battlefield Trust)
  • The second attack took place at the Sunken Road. (American Battlefield Trust)
  • The third attack took place at Antietam Creek. (American Battlefield Trust)

Casualties

  • 2,100 Union soldiers were killed at the Battle of Antietam. (U.S. Department of the Interior)
  • 9,550 Union troops were wounded at the Battle of Antietam. (U.S. Department of the Interior)
  • 750 Union troops were missing at the Battle of Antietam. (U.S. Department of the Interior)
  • 1,550 Confederates were killed at the Battle of Antietam. (U.S. Department of the Interior)
  • 7,750 Confederate soldiers were wounded at the Battle of Antietam. (U.S. Department of the Interior)
  • 1,020 Confederate soldiers were missing at the Battle of Antietam. (U.S. Department of the Interior)
  • There were 12,400 casualties for the Union in total at the Battle of Antietam. (U.S. Department of the Interior)
  • There were 10,320 casualties for the Confederacy in total at the Battle of Antietam. (U.S. Department of the Interior)
  • There were 22,720 casualties in total for both sides at the Battle of Antietam. (U.S. Department of the Interior)
  • 87,000 Union soldiers engaged at the Battle of Antietam. (American Battlefield Trust)
  • 45,000 Confederate soldiers engaged in the battle of Antietam. (American Battlefield Trust)
  • 132,000 soldiers in total engaged at the Battle of Antietam. (American Battlefield Trust)

Results

  • The Battle of Antietam ended on September 18, 1862. (American Battlefield Trust
  • This was a tactical victory for the Union. (American Battlefield Trust)
  • President Abraham Lincoln lost trust in McClellan after the Battle of Antietam. (American Battlefield Trust)
  • This was the bloodiest day of the Civil War and in American history. (American Battlefield Trust)
  • The Emancipation Proclamation was issued in the aftermath of the Battle of Antietam. (American Battlefield Trust)
  • Clara Barton became a hero at the Battle of Antietam. (American Battlefield Trust)

Works Cited

Antietam. American Battlefield Trust. (n.d.). Retrieved May 25, 2022, from https://www.battlefields.org/learn/civil-war/battles/antietam 

U.S. Department of the Interior. (n.d.). Casualties. National Parks Service. Retrieved May 25, 2022, from https://www.nps.gov/anti/learn/historyculture/casualties.htm

One thought on “25 facts/statistics on the battle of Antietam

Add yours

  1. Fits-John Porter was a Union Corps commander at this battle. McClellan wanted him to attack, but he refused, claiming that his corps was needed to protect the Union when Lee defeated the rest of the Army of the Potomac. Also, if Burside’s attack across the creek had not been delayed, his troops would have probably defeated the confederates before Hill arrived.

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%%footer%%